Install Oracle Developer 10G on Windows 11

Today I re-installed Windows 11 on my computer. Actually I had upgraded from Windows 10 to Windows 11 on October 5th, 2021 the same day Microsoft released the half baked OS to public & all of a sudden I realized that, it was a blunder. So, after regretting over a month, I decided to re-install the OS and started installing all my development tools & you know what, I had to refer my Windows 7 post for installing Oracle Developer Suite 10g on my Windows 11!

Much of the post below is from the earliest post that I had for Windows 7, explaining hacks to install Oracle Database 10g and the Suite. Oracle Database 10g is not anymore significant, hence I removed the database part and posting the rest for few unfortunate Oracle developers out there. Well, 10g is used by many business application as on date & if you are looking for a method to install Oracle Database 10g on Windows 11, Please search the blog for Database 10g and you will land on multiple posts explaining to how (Refer Windows 10 articles)

Step 1 Setup Virtual Memory

If your computer has 8GB or more physical memory, all you need is to setup the Virtual Memory for the name sake. Limit the virtual memory to 2048 (2G) or max 4096 (4G). Please use the below images only for reference purposes. After changing the Virtual Memory, You will be asked to restart the computer and please restart.

Step 2 Setting up the Developer Suite

Depending upon the media that you are using for the installation, Oracle Developer 10g has 2 discs & I have copied the content from both disks inside a folder on my computer. (As you could see in the image above)

Open the Disk 1 folder and locate “Setup.exe’, right click and change the compatibility to Windows XP Service Pack 2 or 3 (doesn’t make any difference)

That’s all. Right click and run “setup.exe” as Administrator. If you have a JAVA installation already on the computer, you might receive a warning message for missing entry point, that you can safely ignore.

Follow the same compatibility setting for patch sets, if you have any. Let me know about your experience through comments.

Install Oracle 21c database on Windows

If you have already installed Oracle 19c following instructions available here, installing Oracle database 21c is not much different. Basically 21c is “Innovation Release” & 19c is going to be the long supported version as on date. It plainly means, there is no need to hurry to upgrade your 19c to 21c as next release will be the next long supported version.

Let us see how to install Oracle 21c on Windows (Installed on Windows 10 21H1) & the instructions are same for Windows 11 also.

You can download the 21c Windows installation media from Oracle Database 21c Download for Microsoft Windows x64

Extract the .zip and change the root folder to something like “Oracle12c” (or a name that prefer. Please avoid using spaces with the folder name, example: “Oracle 21c”)

I used a virtual machine with single drive, hence the zip file was extracted and I renamed the extracted folder root to “Oracle21c”

Once the folder is renamed to your choice, open the folder and execute the “setup.exe” as administrator. Please note, you must start the setup as administrator, regardless whether your Windows user account has administrator privileges on the system.

This will kick start the installation process and depending upon the resources available it could take minutes before the installation GUI appears for you.

Choose “Server class” regardless whether you are installing it on a Server OS or client OS. It’s all about managing the resources.

Now, this is a very interesting perspective. “The software directory is the Oracle Database home directory” & the path that you will mention in the edit box is going to be the Oracle base. I hope, now you understood why renaming the media extracted folder to a very meaningful name is important. As usual Oracle suggests you the defaults, however I recommend you to follow a pattern that you can feel comfortable with.

As you could see, the default installation sets up one pdb. You may rename the default PDB at this level.

Here I left everything to defaults as my intentions were pretty limited to installation. Unless you have a reason to set up Automatic Memory management, go ahead with the well trusted manual management, that gives you granular level control on how the memory is utilized by the database.

You can change the database character set to another from the “Choose from the following list of character sets” (Specifically for Arabic and other left to right languages)

You may choose a different location for the database data files. Just make sure that the current user has full access to the path.

Use the same password for a TEST installation & follow the Oracle recommendations for PRODUCTION environments. Please note, it’s better to use the complex passwords with expiry disabled for the default profile.

That’s all folks. It’s not like the earlier times when one had to hack the installation files to install Oracle database on newer Windows OS. Starting from 11g, Oracle database gets installed on Windows 7 and later OS without complaining as long as the OS is fully patched with updates and .NET components.

Hope this post helps few newbies (& me)

Windows 11 | Dial a VPN Connection using PowerShell script

I started blogging once after upgrading to Windows 7 & posted mostly about the ridiculous bugs Microsoft exported with that OS. Gradually Windows 7 got matured (hardly ever fixing the yellow triangle network icon issue) & my entire attention switched to what I do for salaries, Oracle development & later much of my posts were about the stack.

Now Microsoft has released another half cooked OS, Windows 11. From a layman perspectives I cannot understand how someone could make such decisions that affect the established stability and ease of use of an OS that creates huge disappointments for general userbase!

Other than cosmetic changes and revamped settings area, I cannot defer Windows 11 from Windows 10, plus the disappointment of losing the start menu that I was getting used to after loads of patience and efforts. Among many of such grievances, connecting to VPN at work is so ridiculous, requiring 4 mouse clicks! So I decided to go with a cmd/powershell script this time to avoid those 4 mouse clicks.

After weighing the possibilities of extending , I decided to go with PowerShell (Version 5)

So let us check how it works. Copy the following in to a text file

rasdial.exe "Your VPN Name"

Save the file as “Dial VPN.ps1” or any other name you prefer with extension “.ps1”.

Make sure you wrap the VPN name using double quotes. “rasdial.exe” is not a powershell cmdlet, an old Windows OS friendly dialer. This executable is generally found in the Windows\System32 folder and there is no need to specify the path, unless you modified the PATH environment variable. Now create a new shortcut on the desktop and type/copy the following (Please adjust the file path as per your setup) as command for the shortcut

powershell.exe -File "C:\scripts\Dial-VPN.ps1"

Usually I keep all my scripts in a folder named “Scripts” on the C: drive. Hence the -File parameter clearly mentions the script’s path.

That’s all, you can double click and open the pre-configured VPN connection without going through the 4 click hassles on Windows 11 (or multiple clicks on other Windows OS versions)

Now, let us look at a fancier version of the above. What if you want to connect if not connected and disconnect if already connected? Please note, this script could be extended beyond this level depending upon specific requirements. I have started with the skeleton and will be happy to receive better scripts from you.

#https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/2271983-auto-connect-vpn
#http://woshub.com/popup-notification-powershell/
            
$vpnname = "Your VPN Name"
$vpnusername = "YOURUSERNAME"
$vpnpassword = "YOURPASSWORD"
$cmd = $env:WINDIR + "\System32\rasdial.exe"
            
try{
$vpn = Get-VpnConnection -Name $vpnname -ErrorAction Stop
Write-Host $vpn.ConnectionStatus
}
catch {
$message = $_
$wshell = New-Object -ComObject Wscript.Shell
$Output = $wshell.Popup("Failed to retrieve Connection status. $message",0,"VPN Connection Status",64)
}
            
if ($vpn.ConnectionStatus -eq "Disconnected")
{
$expression = "$cmd ""$vpnname"" "
Invoke-Expression -Command $expression 
$wshell = New-Object -ComObject Wscript.Shell
$Output = $wshell.Popup("VPN Connected",0,"VPN Connection Status",64)
}
else {
$wshell = New-Object -ComObject Wscript.Shell
$Output = $wshell.Popup("Your VPN Connection will be disconnected, Are you sure?",0,"VPN Connection Status",4+32)

if($Output -eq 6){
$expression = "$cmd ""$vpnname"" /DISCONNECT"
Write-Host $expression
Invoke-Expression -Command $expression 
$wshell = New-Object -ComObject Wscript.Shell
$Output = $wshell.Popup("VPN Disconnected",0,"VPN Connection Status",64)
}

}
#start-sleep -seconds 30
 

Please note, I am a beginner with PowerShell(Also) and always will be. As usual, I have provided the links to original codes & possible other links those helped me to device the above.

The above can, dial your VPN connection, warn you before you disconnect etcetera. For my ease, I prefer to use the extended version of the script as I keep on switching the connections. You may able to extend the script once again by accepting the VPN connection name, so that you can use the same script for dialing different VPN connections (if you have many)

Have suggestions? please pass them to me through the comments section.

Windows 11 | Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT)

A wonderful article about installing RSAT (Remove server administration tools) on Windows 11 is available at How To Install RSAT On Windows 11 PCs HTMD Blog (anoopcnair.com)

I would like reiterate something Anoop has mentioned in his article. If you are using Microsoft SCCM or Windows Update Services (WU), then you must enable the local group policy as he has mentioned clearly in his post.

The image attached by Anoop could be bit confusing for the local group policy setup, hence I am uploading one with better visibility. The path is “Computer Configuration->Administrative Templates->System” & you need to open “Specify settings for optional component installation and component repair”

No need to reboot the computer for installing RSAT components. Follow Anoop’s thread and be a happy Administrator!